Bonphilosophia is a digital website dedicated to featuring work by emerging and established artists and cultural influencers. 

DOE PAORO

DOE PAORO

Photo: Josh Taylor (@truthgun)

Some singers possess so much soul that they shake you in places you didn’t know existed. That’s what happened to me when I first heard Doe Paoro’s voice. I was sitting in a reiki cacao ceremony at Golden Folk Wellness in Silver Lake with a room full of the kindest strangers. It was in the middle of this summer’s infamous eclipse season. The city was hot and stressful. We all drank amazingly blissful cacao, stared into each other’s eyes, shook off our demons, and had ourselves the most sincere moment of relief. Doe played us the medicinal music and sounds that she’s learned from all over the world. I will never forget how cleansed I was that night. Pain, regret and sorrow melted off my skin and I transcended into another state of living. Our conversation below is the first of a four-part series where I interview four LA-based healers who changed me for the better. With their work, I found my magic again. It brings me great joy to share their gifts with you.

 Photo: Rinny Perkins (@rinnyriot)

Photo: Rinny Perkins (@rinnyriot)

Tell us about your singing career. When did it start? How would you describe your sound? I usually describe my sound as soulful. My sound has changed throughout the years -  it can be ethereal and earthy. I have been writing songs and making records since I was 16 but I began Doe Paoro in 2011, when I was 27, following an 8 month solo travel period which involved a long period of music and meditation study in India.

What's your favorite part about being a sound/meditative healer? Specifically in Los Angeles? Through sound and music, you have the ability for many people coming from all different states of minds and experiences to arrive on the same vibration. It is so unifying and deep. One of the theories behind sound healing is that the body can heal itself when it is relaxed and music offers a way to create that receptive state. I love sound healing because of the benefit it offers to others and how it takes the ego out of music. In Los Angeles, I have really enjoyed creative sacred communities and spaces and offering a portal out of normal routines.

Where do you offer your services? Internationally. I tour my music worldwide and I also offer "Breathwork and Sound Healing" workshops in different cities. I've done the most work with sound healing in London and Los Angeles, because those are the cities I have lived in most recently.

 Photo courtesy of the artist

Photo courtesy of the artist

What are your current music projects? I released a new album called "Soft Power" on October 19th. This is a collection of songs that I've been working on over the last 4 years and it was recorded in London. I will be on tour for most of the rest of the year. On the side, I'm continuing to write for other artists and offer sound healing in private sessions or with bigger groups. I'll was at the Desert Daze festival last month leading a meditation and kirtan. 

What has been the biggest lesson you've learned in your healer journey? Usually, whatever you need to heal within yourself ends up being the medicine you can carry and serve to others, once you cure yourself first. You learn the path to healing through the journey of your own body and that is the initiation. The reward of coming out the other side of disease or trauma is that you can now help others and you have the strength of survival and recovery.

What's the most sacred place in the world to you? Probably Mcleod Ganj in India because I have experienced many transformational and even mystical moments there. It's where the Dalai Lama lives. 

What themes surround your work? Detachment, forgiveness, acceptance, compassion, and love. 

Describe how you keep yourself inspired. I need to be learning and experiencing new things to stay in inspiration. Also, listening deeply to others. If I feel uninspired, it's usually a sign to me that I'm talking more than I'm listening. Travel always helps ;) 

What is next for you? Releasing this new album and touring it!

 Photo: Zephan Hwang (@leddzephan)

Photo: Zephan Hwang (@leddzephan)

“Every struggle is its own kind of love.”
— "Shadows" by Doe Paoro & Son Little
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John Sparagana

John Sparagana